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By Orangeburg Dental
February 09, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
WhyStoppingGumDiseaseShouldbeaTopDentalCarePriority

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), nearly half of U.S. adults over 30 are afflicted with some form of periodontal (gum) disease—and one in five could be classified as severe. What's more, the incidence of disease only increases with age.

February is Gum Disease Awareness Month, a subject well worth its own focus month. The disease can be highly destructive and ultimately affect your overall well-being.

The various forms of the disease all have a common origin—dental plaque, a thin, bacteria-laden food film that naturally accumulates on teeth. The multiplying bacteria within plaque can first infect the surface tissues of the gums, especially around the gum line.

Although the body initiates an inflammatory response and releases antibodies to fight the infection, it's often not enough. Fueled by plaque, the infection can continue to advance into the gums and ultimately reach the tooth roots and supporting bone. If this occurs, the outcome could be devastating to both your oral and general health.

For one, an infection can weaken the periodontal ligaments that help secure teeth in place. This can cause them to detach from the teeth, creating infection-filled voids between the teeth and gums called periodontal pockets. The gums may also pull back or recede from the teeth, further exposing their roots to infection.

The spreading disease may also directly infect and damage tooth roots and the supporting bone. As a result, both the teeth and bone can lose a substantial amount of their structure.

As this process continues, the affected teeth may eventually pay the ultimate price and become lost. Losing teeth affects not only a person's appearance, but their overall dental function as well.

Given the odds of an encounter with this disease and the potential devastation that may follow, it's well worth doing everything possible to avoid it. The most important thing you can do is to eliminate the regular accumulation of plaque through daily brushing and flossing, as well as dental cleanings at least twice a year.

It's equally important to remain alert to any signs of infection. If you notice your gums are red or swollen, or if they bleed easily when you brush, call us as soon as possible for a closer examination.

Hopefully, your personal oral hygiene and regular dental care will keep you out of the reach of this harmful oral infection. And, should gum disease occur, the sooner we catch it and begin treating it, the less likely your mouth suffers extensive damage and tooth loss. Your oral health and well-being depend on it.

If you would like more information about preventing and treating periodontal disease, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Gum Disease Gets Started.”

By Orangeburg Dental
January 30, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental care  
ProperDentalWorkCareWillExtendTheirLongevity

Modern dental restorations are not only more life-like than past generations, but also more durable. Today's fillings, crowns and bridges can last for years or even decades.

But that doesn't mean you can set them and forget them—they all require some level of maintenance and care. Here are 3 common restorations and what you need to do to make them last.

Fillings. Whether traditional dental amalgam ("silver") or tooth-colored composites, fillings today are incredibly strong and durable. But they do have one point of vulnerability, especially larger ones—the seam where the filling material meets the natural tooth. Bacteria tend to build up along this seam, which could lead to decay and the formation of a new cavity that weakens the filling. To avoid this, be sure you're brushing and flossing everyday and seeing your dentist at least twice a year.

Veneers. Dentists bond these thin shells of tooth-colored porcelain over the visible surface of teeth to hide chips, stains or other blemishes. But although the bonding agents we use create an incredibly strong hold, the bond between the veneer and tooth could weaken when subjected to higher than normal biting forces produced by nail-biting, ice-chewing or a tooth grinding habit. If you have such a habit, see your dentist about ways to minimize it and protect your veneers.

Bridges. Traditional bridges consist of an array of artificial crowns with those in the middle substituting for the missing teeth, while those on the end attach to the natural teeth on either side of the gap to support the bridge. Bridges can also be supported by dental implants. In either case, tooth decay or gum disease could undermine the natural teeth or bone supporting a bridge. To avoid a bridge failure, keep the areas around supporting teeth or implants clean and regularly checked by a dentist.

Above all, the danger dental disease poses to natural tissues also threatens the restorations that depend on them. Keeping your mouth free of disease is your best strategy for ensuring your dental work enjoys a long, functional life.

If you would like more information on protecting your dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Extending the Life of Your Dental Work.”

ImplantsStreamlineDentalWorkUpgradesforGradualToothLoss

One day, you lose one… followed by another…and then another. And then, after years of dental disease, you finally lose all your remaining teeth.

But between the first tooth lost and the last, years or even decades could pass. Individuals in the past caught in this downward spiral often decided the cost of continually upgrading their restorations with each lost tooth was simply too much. Instead, they opted at some point to have their remaining teeth extracted, even relatively healthy ones, to make way for full dentures.

That's still an option you might one day want to consider. Today, though, you have another alternative: With the help of dental implants, you can easily update your restorations with gradual tooth loss and keep more of your natural teeth longer. And keeping them longer is often the best scenario for maintaining optimum oral health.

Most people are familiar with dental implants as single replacements for individual teeth. It's a straightforward application. A dentist imbeds a titanium metal post into the jawbone at the missing tooth site, to which they later attach a life-like crown.  Over time, the titanium post attracts new bone growth, resulting in enhanced durability for the implant, while also helping to reduce the bone loss that typically occurs after losing teeth.

But implants can also be used to support more traditional restorations like bridges or partial dentures. When used in that manner you only need a small number to support a restoration for multiple teeth, a much more affordable method than an individual implant for each tooth. And with planning and forethought, earlier installed implants could be incorporated into the next phase of restoration.

This helps make the process of updating restorations more manageable and affordable, while also prolonging the life of your remaining teeth. And should the time come when you lose all your teeth, implants can support a full fixed bridge or a removable denture. Including dental implants in your ongoing treatment strategy can pay dividends toward maintaining your best oral health.

If you would like more information on the many applications for dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Replacing All Teeth But Not All at Once.”

RussellWilsonsFunnyVideoAsideRemovingWisdomTeethisNoLaughingMatter

There are plenty of hilarious videos of groggy patients coming out of wisdom teeth surgery to keep you occupied for hours. While many of these have turned everyday people into viral video stars, every now and then it really is someone famous. Recently, that someone was Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson.

The NFL star underwent oral surgery to remove all four of his third molars (aka wisdom teeth). His wife, performer and supermodel, Ciara, caught him on video as he was wheeled to recovery and later uploaded the clip to Instagram. As post-wisdom teeth videos go, Wilson didn't say anything too embarrassing other than, "My lips hurt."

Funny videos aside, though, removing wisdom teeth is a serious matter. Typically, the third molars are the last permanent teeth to erupt, and commonly arrive late onto a jaw already crowded with other teeth. This increases their chances of erupting out of alignment or not erupting at all, remaining completely or partially submerged within the gums.

This latter condition, impaction, can put pressure on the roots of adjacent teeth, can cause abnormal tooth movement resulting in a poor bite, or can increase the risk of dental disease. For that reason, it has been a common practice to remove wisdom teeth preemptively, even if they aren't showing any obvious signs of disease.

In recent years, though, dentists have become increasingly nuanced in making that decision. Many will now leave wisdom teeth be if they have erupted fully and are in proper alignment, and they don't appear to be diseased or causing problems for other teeth.

The best way to make the right decision is to closely monitor the development of wisdom teeth throughout childhood and adolescence. If signs of any problems begin to emerge, it may become prudent to remove them, usually between the ages of 16 and 25. Because of their location and root system, wisdom teeth are usually removed by an oral surgeon through one of the most common surgeries performed each year.

This underscores the need for children to see a dentist regularly, beginning no later than their first birthday. It's also a good idea for a child to undergo an orthodontic evaluation around age 6. Both of these types of exams can prove helpful in deciding on what to do about the wisdom teeth, depending on the individual case.

After careful monitoring throughout childhood and adolescence, the best decision might be to remove them.  If so, take it from Russell Wilson: It's worth becoming the star of a funny video to protect both current and future dental health.

If you would like more information about wisdom teeth removal, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth.”

By Orangeburg Dental
December 31, 2021
Category: Oral Health
AMinorProcedureCouldHelpanInfantWithThisNursingProblem

Newborns come into the world eager and ready to partake of their mother's milk. But an anatomical quirk with some infants could make breastfeeding more difficult for them.

The structure in question is a frenum, a tiny band of tissue connecting softer parts of the mouth with firmer parts, like the upper lip to the gums, and the tongue to the floor of the mouth. If they're abnormally short, thick or tight, however, the baby might find it difficult to obtain a good seal around the mother's nipple.

Without that seal, the baby has a difficult time drawing milk out of the breast and as a result, they may attempt to compensate by chewing on the nipple. The sad outcome is often continuing hunger and frustration for the baby, and pain for the mother.

To alleviate this problem, a physician can clip the frenum to loosen it. Known as a frenotomy, (or a frenectomy or frenuplasty, depending on the exact actions taken), it's a minor procedure a doctor can perform in their office.

It begins with the doctor deadening the area with a numbing gel or injected anesthesia. After a few minutes to allow the anesthesia to take effect, they clip the frenum with surgical scissors or with a laser (there's usually little to no bleeding with the latter).

Once the frenum has been clipped, the baby should be able to nurse right away. However, they may have a learning curve to using the now freed-up parts of their mouth to obtain a solid seal while nursing.

Abnormal frenums that interfere with nursing are usually treated as soon as possible. But even if it isn't impeding breastfeeding, an abnormal frenum could eventually interfere with other functions like speech development, or it could foster the development of a gap between the front teeth. It may be necessary, then, to revisit the frenum at an older age and treat it at that time.

Although technically a surgical procedure, frenotomies are minor and safe to perform on newborns. Their outcome, though, can be transformative, allowing a newborn to gain the full nourishment and emotional bonding they need while breastfeeding.

If you would like more information on tongue or lip ties, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tongue Ties, Lip Ties and Breastfeeding.”





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